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September 26, 2014

US Forest Service Hiring for Internship Program at National Convention
For more information, see #4 under SAF News.


E-Forester Archives? More than a few folks have asked if The E-Forester is archived on the SAF website. It is not, primarily because links to news articles change quickly. However, if you're looking for something from a past issue, contact me and I'll do my best to get you what you need.

I. Featured News

1. US Joins Other Nations in Deforestation Accord at UN Summit
2. New Law to Crack Down on Timber Theft
3. Report: Milder Winter in Upper Peninsula Is Affecting Forests
4. Beyond Killing Trees, Emerald Ash Borer May Leave Lasting Impression
5. Wildfire News

Forest Products Industry

6. Simpson May Sell Mill, Timber Sales Up in Wisconsin, Timber Sales Up in Ohio, and Hugo's Effects Still Apparent
7. Competitive Rather than Restrictive Wood Markets in Oregon, Ontario to Allow Six-Story Wood Buildings, and Blowing the Whistle on Self-Policing in British Columbia
8. Biomass News

Federal Lands Management & Policy News

9. Tongass Logging Project Moves Forward to Keep Small Towns Alive
10. County Leaders, Lawmakers Craft Federal Land Management Strategies
11. California Wildfire Recovery Efforts Often Lead to Court Battles
12. Experts Set Sights on Saving Threatened Whitebark Pines
13. Federal Government Wants to Restrict Filming in Wilderness Areas

II. Publications, Resources, and Items of Interest

1. Great Lakes Timber Professionals Association, Wisconsin County Forests Association Soliciting Research Proposals on Selective Harvesting Restrictions
2. Scientist: Amazon Forest Could Become an "Impoverished Savannah" under Climate Change
3. Of Planting Trees and Saving the Planet

III. Science and Technology

1. UF Study: State's Urban Tree-Planting Projects Are Working
2. Study Helps Assess Impact of Temperature on Belowground Soil Decomposition
3. Warming Climate Has Consequences Now and in the Future for Forests in Wisconsin and Michigan

IV. SAF News

1. 2014 SAF Elections Ballot
2. Be Sure You Receive Your 2014 Election Ballot
3. SAF Launches New Membership Portal
4. 2014 SAF Convention News—Info on Everything from Airfare to Presentations
5. Research You May Be Missing
6. World Forestry Center to Hold Wake for Bill Hagenstein


I. Featured News

All of these items and more appear in the "Featured News" section on the SAF home page

1. US Joins Other Nations in Deforestation Accord at UN Summit

LA Times.com (September 23) — Moving to halt a powerful contributor to climate change, the United States has joined more than 110 corporations, civil society groups, and governments to launch a global initiative to reduce deforestation sharply over the next 15 years, with the goal of eliminating the practice by 2030.

The "New York Declaration on Forests," unveiled at the United Nations Climate Summit on September 23, would reduce between 4.5 billion and 8.8 billion tons of greenhouse gases annually, according to the United Nations Development Program (UNDP). The effort would be equal to "removing from the road every car in the world, or not burning a trillion pounds of coal, or turning off every smokestack and tailpipe" in the United States, the UNDP said.

Brazil Says No to Global Forest Plan

Postbulletin.com (September 23) — More than 30 countries set the first-ever deadline on Tuesday to end deforestation by 2030, but the feasibility of such a goal was eroded when a key player, Brazil, said it would not join.

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2. New Law to Crack Down on Timber Theft

Macon.com (September 20) — Prior to a Georgia law that went into effect July 1, owners of timberland had little recourse if trees were intentionally or, more likely, unintentionally cut from the wrong property, said Matt Hestad, communications coordinator with the Georgia Forestry Association.

Now, the Timber Security Law gives the Georgia Forestry Commission more investigative and arresting power in cases of unauthorized timber harvest, much like its authority in cases of timber arson.

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3. Report: Milder Winter in Upper Peninsula Is Affecting Forests

Beetle Begins to Lay Waste to Macon County Ash Trees

Michigan Radio.org (September 23) — The US Forest Service has put out a report on how the warming climate is affecting forests in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Stephen Handler is a climate change specialist with the Forest Service. He says, over the past several decades, we've been getting more extreme rainstorms in the region.

Handler says that's giving species like red maple an edge because it doesn't do well in harsh winters. He says some other species, like black spruce, could get stressed by warmer winters.

A summary of the report, created by the Climate Change Response Framework, includes suggestions of what forest managers and landowners can do to help. It says that managers can use the scientific information from the report to better understand how particular forests may be more or less vulnerable.

More from the North Central Region:

Demand for Firewood Crackles Up North

Star Tribune.com (September 21) — Having firewood trucked in from 100 miles away or more is a choice more northern Minnesota homeowners are making after last winter's propane prices and this year's wet weather dried up the area's supply of seasoned firewood.

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4. Beyond Killing Trees, Emerald Ash Borer May Leave Lasting Impression

WESA.fm (September 23) — The Emerald Ash Borer has all but wiped out ash trees in and around the Pittsburgh region, and even though the insect only goes after one tree species, the effects will be felt on a much wider scale.

The small insect, native to Asia and eastern Russia, has been in the United States since the early 2000s. It was first confirmed to be in Pennsylvania in 2007. Once a tree is infested it can take the ash borers three to four years to kill it.

More:

Shots May Save West Des Moines Ash Trees

DesMoines Register.com (September 24) — The emerald ash borer has not arrived in west Des Moines, but city officials are continuing to examine and adopt new ways to prepare for the inevitable infestation.

The city's initial management plan to confront the wood-boring species called for removing all 1,100 of the city's ash tree inventory over about a four-year period.

But this week, city officials said new data about an alternative treatment method will allow them to keep some trees. A product called TREE-age, which is a trunk-injected insecticide, has been used effectively in many cities, including Milwaukee, said John Olds, west Des Moines' urban forestry supervisor.

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5. Wildfire News

NIFC.gov (September 24) — The National Interagency Fire Center reported that, for the week of September 24, "Nationally, the majority of the fire activity continues in Oregon and northern California. Favorable weather conditions are forecast to help firefighters with their suppression efforts in these two states. The Scoggins Creek Fire in Oregon was contained at 211 acres."

Headlines:

California Fires Expected to Continue
TicoTimes.net (September 23)

King Fire Threatens Decades of Campus Research
DailyCal.org (September 22)

California's Giant King Fire Continues to Burn. Here's How It Looks from Above
Washington Post.com (September 23)

Size, Growth of King Fire Leads to Criticism of Forest Management Policies
KFBK.com (September 23)

Record Amount of Retardant Used in Northern California Wildfire
Claimsjournal.com (September 22)

Happy Camp Fire Nears Containment; Flood Worries Rise
IJPR.org

How Do You Say How Big a Really Big Fire Is?
KQED.org

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Forest Products Industry

6. Simpson May Sell Mill, Timber Sales Up in Wisconsin, Timber Sales Up in Ohio, and Hugo's Effects Still Apparent

Simpson Lumber May Sell Longview Mill

TDN.com (September 23) — Privately owned Simpson Lumber Co. may be offered for sale, according to a report by the Tacoma News Tribune. Among Simpson's operations is a Longview mill, which opened in 2007, that employs about 85 full-time workers and another 10 temporary employees. The company also has mills in Tacoma, the location of its corporate offices, and Shelton in Washington, as well as in Georgetown, South Carolina, and Meldrim, Georgia.

According to the report, the 124-year-old company has hired a financial adviser to explore the possibility of selling the business.

Sales of Timber on Wisconsin State Land Up 8 Percent

JS Online.com (September 23) — Sales of timber on state land hit a record $11.7 million last year, the Department of Natural Resources reported earlier this week.

Sales rose 8% in fiscal 2014, which ended on June 30, over the previous year.

In the past decade, timber sales have increased 125%, the agency said.

The state's top forester and an industry official say the increase is good news for the state's pulp and hardwood industry, which has sometimes struggled to procure adequate supplies of wood in Wisconsin.

Timber from State Forests Adds to Ohio's Income, but Environmentalists Fret

Dispatch.com (September 23) — Over the past 15 years, more than 115 million board feet of timber have been harvested from Ohio's public forests. Logging has become a moneymaker for the state government: In 1999, timber sales generated a little less than $1.8 million. Last year, sales made the state about $4.4 million.

State Department of Natural Resources officials contend harvesting can be good for the health of a forest and the state develops management plans for each forest that determine where and how to log. Some management plans call for the state to plant new trees; others simply let nature take its course.

Naturalists, though, say the process takes decades. And some question whether the money the state gets is worth it.

Hugo's Destruction of Timber Still Affects Supply Today

Live5News.com (September 23) — The sounds of snapping timber during Hurricane Hugo reminded one South Carolina tree farmer of a war zone. Another industry veteran said the replanting that followed created a "Wall of Wood" he compared to the post-World War II Baby Boom.

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7. Competitive Rather than Restrictive Wood Markets in Oregon, Ontario to Allow Six-Story Wood Buildings, and Blowing the Whistle on Self-Policing in British Columbia

Competitive Standards Strengthens Oregon's Forests

Forbes.com (September 22) — A new study commissioned by Governor John Kitzhaber underscores the need for competitive, rather than restrictive, markets for wood and timber products harvested in Oregon. Existing building policies for sustainable wood products stifle, rather than foster competition.

Specifically, the market for "certified" timber has been disrupted by unnecessary policies that limit the type of wood that enters construction projects designated as "green" and artificially inflate the demand for products certified by one organization.

Ontario Building Code to Allow Six-Story Wood Frame Buildings

Daily Commercial News.com (September 23) — Ontario is set to make changes to its Building Code that will allow the construction of wood-frame buildings of up to six stories, according to a government news release.

The government says the changes will give builders a safe option that can help make building a home more affordable and the flexibility to construct pedestrian-oriented buildings that enhance landscapes while maintaining safety for pedestrians.

The changes are scheduled to officially kick in Jan. 1, 2015.

BC Agencies Blow Whistle on Forestry Self-Policing

BIV.com (September 22) — Problems in British Columbia's forest regulatory system are raising flags among a growing number of agencies and organizations, prompting some to say the province is at risk of losing public confidence in resource development.

The alarm and the calls for change are coming from the watchdog Forest Practices Board, the Association of BC Forest Professionals, which governs foresters, and the Professional Employees Association that represents public sector professionals.

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8. Biomass News

Nebraska Hopes Grants Stoke Use of Wood as Fuel

Omaha.com (September 22) — The Nebraska Forest Service says it is offering up to $200,000 to assist business, charities, and governments with converting their buildings to heating systems capable of burning wood.

Using what Smith calls abundant supplies of wood waste can save up to 50 percent on utility costs, he said. Funding for the program originated from the Wildfire Control Act of 2013, which calls for the development of markets for woody biomass generated from forest thinnings.

$230M Biomass Plant Proposed for Albany P&G Plant

BizJournals.com (Georgia, September 23) — State officials are talking with Procter & Gamble and Constellation New Energy to work out details that would allow for construction of a $230 million biomass energy plant on the P&G-Albany campus.

Red Rock Biofuels Selection Could Boost Lake County

Herald and News.com (Oregon, September 22) — Lake County's economy could experience a much needed boost, following a decision by the federal government to select Red Rock Biofuels, which is considering building a multi-million dollar biomass plant in Lakeview, to produce fuel for military and private sector transportation under the US Department of Defense's Defense Protection Act.

Secretary of Agriculture Tom Visack said at a recent White House press conference that Red Rock Biofuels will use woody biomass to create 12 MMgy of advanced biofuels for the US Navy and Marines. Debris from logging or thinning operations is used to produce fuel at the facility in Lakeview.

More about Red Rock Biofuels:

Red Rock Biofuels Lands Contracts with Southwest Airlines, Government
Biz Journals.com (Colorado, September 24)

Legislation Would Extend Biofuel, Bioenergy Tax Credits

Biomass Magazine.com (September 23) — The Bridge to a Clean Energy Future Act of 2014 (HR 5559), legislation introduced in the US House of Representatives on September 19, aims to extend several clean energy tax incentives. Among them is the second generation biofuel producer credit. Under current law, facilities producing cellulosic biofuel can claim a $1.01 per gallon production tax credit on fuel produced before the end of 2013. The bill would extend the tax credit for an additional two years, for cellulosic biofuel produced through 2015.

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Federal Lands Management and Forest Policy News

9. Tongass Logging Project Moves Forward to Keep Small Towns Alive

KTVA.com (September 23) — Thousands of acres of old-growth forest will be put up for sale this week by the US Forest Service — the largest logging project announced in two decades.

The project area is located on Prince of Wales Island in the Tongass National Forest. Its size, 6,186 acres of old-growth forest and 46 miles of new roads, is controversial and conservation groups have sued the Forest Service to halt the project.

Forrest Cole, supervisor for the Tongass National Forest, predicts around 600 jobs will be created and many more will be supported by the increase in population.

Related:

Federal Government Agrees to Decision Deadline for Protection Status of Southeast Alaska Wolves
Greenfieldreporter.com (September 24)

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10. County Leaders, Lawmakers Craft Federal Land Management Strategies

Deseret News.com (September 24) — Multiple rural county leaders begged a newly formed legislative commission — the Commission for the Public Stewardship of Public Lands — to take an active management role on the lands.

Tasked with crafting a management and stewardship plan should the state gain control of certain federal lands within its borders, the commission sought input from county leaders on what effective land management practices might look like in their particular area.

Rampant bark beetle kills in national forests, overpopulation of wild horses, reduced grazing permits and a federal government beholden to special interest groups were among the litany of complaints paraded before the commission.

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11. California Wildfire Recovery Efforts Often Lead to Court Battles

Goldrushcam.com (September 24) — Almost immediately after the Stanislaus forest supervisor issued a Rim Fire recovery plan last month, environmental groups went to court to prevent portions of it from being implemented. Specifically, the groups wanted to block plans for salvage logging on 15,000 acres of the 260,000 acres affected by the fire.

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12. Experts Set Sights on Saving Threatened Whitebark Pines

Spokesman.com (September 24) - Whitebark pines need help if the species is going to survive, said scientists from the United States and Canada, who gathered in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, last weekend for a meeting of the Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Foundation.

The candelabra-shaped pines — an icon of the high-mountain West — face a triple threat from an introduced blister rust, a mountain pine beetle epidemic, and climate change.

More:

For Trees Under Threat, Flight May Be Best Response

New York Times.com (September 18) — Traditionally, conservation biologists have sought to protect endangered plants and animals where they live, creating refuges where species can be shielded from threats like hunting and pollution. But a refuge won't help the whitebark pine, and so now scientists are pondering a simple but radical new idea: moving the trees to where they will be more comfortable in the future.

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13. Federal Government Wants to Restrict Filming in Wilderness Areas

Statesman Journal.com (September 24) — The US Forest Service has proposed a set of rules that would strictly limit filming and photography in federal wilderness areas by media companies, commercial outfitters, nonprofit groups, and even, potentially, members of the general public.

The directive, which has been on the books for 48 months but hasn't been enforced, is intended to tighten restrictions on people and organizations that derive commercial gain or seek to raise funds through images taken within the 36 million acres of wilderness area managed by the Forest Service.

The proposed rules would require newspaper photographers, television producers, or filmmakers to obtain a special use permit before entering a wilderness area — unless they were covering "breaking news." A Forest Service supervisor would then determine whether the story has merit under the criteria of the directive.

More:

Forest Service Says Media Needs Photography Permit in Wilderness Areas, Alarming First Amendment Advocates
Oregon Live.com (September 23)

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II. Publications, Resources, and Items of Interest

1. Great Lakes Timber Professionals Association, Wisconsin County Forests Association Soliciting Research Proposals on Selective Harvesting Restrictions

The Great Lakes Timber Professionals Association and Wisconsin County Forests Association are soliciting proposals for research on economic and ecological consequences of selected timber harvesting restrictions in Wisconsin. Research priorities and other aspects of the solicitation are described in the Wisconsin Forest Practices Study Request for Proposal 2.0.

The Request for Proposal 2.0 and additional information about the Wisconsin Forest Practices Study (WFPS) can be found on the Wisconsin Forestry Practices Study website.

Questions regarding the WFPS and the attached Request for Proposal should be directed to Fred Souba, WFPS Project Manager, at (715) 213-4833.

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2. Scientist: Amazon Forest Could Become an "Impoverished Savannah" under Climate Change

Trust.org (September 18) — Carlos Nobre, Brazil's National Secretary for Research and Development Policies and a member of the UN Secretary General's High-Level Panel on Global Sustainability, said that despite tremendous progress in curbing deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, modeling gives a glimpse of the potential negative impacts of climate change.

Nobre is one of six world-renowned scientists who will speak at the Colloquium on Forests and Climate in New York on September 24. An interview with him in which he discusses the content of his address appears in this article.

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3. Of Planting Trees and Saving the Planet

In an opinion–editorial appearing in the September 20 New York Times, "To Save the Planet, Don't Plant Trees," Nadine Unger, assistant professor of atmospheric chemistry at Yale, argues that reducing deforestation and planting trees won't help fix climate change but will rather make it worse.

As might be expected, Unger's provocative op-ed caused a stir and was met with several op-ed rebuttals, which appear below.

You Cannot Save the Climate without Trees
National Geographic.com (September 22)

NY Times Forests Op-Ed Is Out on a Limb: Protecting Trees Still Key to Solving Climate Change
EDF.org (September 20)

Scientists Rebut NY Times Op-Ed "To Save the Planet, Don't Plant Trees"
Mongabay.com (September 21)

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III. Science and Technology

1. UF Study: State's Urban Tree-Planting Projects Are Working

Ocala.com (September 17) — A study by University of Florida researchers bodes well for cities sinking millions of public dollars into large-scale tree-planting projects.

Using data from the Florida Forest Service, they found that more than 9 out of 10 trees planted as part of an urban tree program over a five-year period remained standing an average of three years after they had been planted.

The researchers also found that the success rate of the plantings had a lot to do with the heartiness of the tree planted and adherence to Forest Service protocols, such as following the plantings with checkups.

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2. Study Helps Assess Impact of Temperature on Belowground Soil Decomposition

US Forest Service (September 23) — A new paper in the journal Nature Climate Change concludes that climate warming does not accelerate soil organic carbon decomposition or affect soil carbon storage, despite increases in ecosystem productivity.

The research, led by US Forest Service Research Ecologist Christian Giardina, shows that soil carbon storage was constant across a highly constrained 5 degrees Celsius gradient of mean annual temperature in tropical montane wet forest in Hawaii.

The scientists also showed an increase in productivity across the gradient, both above- and below-ground, and an increase in the decomposition rate of fresh litter and a decline in coarse woody debris with warming. From these results, they concluded that long-term warming in tropical montane forests will accelerate carbon cycling, but is unlikely to cause net losses of soil carbon.

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3. Warming Climate Has Consequences Now and in the Future for Forests in Wisconsin and Michigan

US Forest Service (September 20) — Between 1961 and 2011, the frequency of rainstorms of 3 inches or more increased by 3 times in Wisconsin and by 2.8 times in Michigan. A new US Forest Service forest vulnerability assessment suggests that more intense rainfalls are among the effects of a changing climate that will ripple through forest management, affecting infrastructure, wildlife, and ecosystem restoration.

The assessment describes effects of climate change that have already been observed, projected changes in the climate and the landscape, and forest vulnerabilities in a 16-million-acre region of forest in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and northern Wisconsin.

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IV. SAF News

1. 2014 SAF Elections Ballot

As you know, the 2014 SAF national and unit elections and referendum votes will be held in October. All SAF members will receive a ballot and are encouraged to vote. Please be aware, though, that there is an important change to the ballot.

After receiving comments from members about consequences of consolidating SAF's membership categories, the Council decided to withdraw those questions from the ballot. A letter from President Dave Walters explaining this decision can be found on the SAF website.

Council representatives are committed to talking with as many SAF members as possible about the rationale for consolidating the membership categories. If you are already engaged with the Council, thank you. If not, please speak your mind. The Council wants to hear your thoughts on how to increase SAF's relevance to every natural-resources professional who works in or is closely associated with forestry.

Please don't hesitate to contribute your insights, experience, and wisdom on this issue. Here's how you can do so:

  • Share your thoughts with us at membershipdialog@safnet.org
  • Talk to your Council member or your state society, division, or chapter leadership
  • Join SAF discussions on LinkedIn
  • Submit a letter to the editor of The Forestry Source (send letters to editor Steve Wilent at wilents@safnet.org).

If you have any questions on the votes, please feel free to contact SAF chief executive officer Matt Menashes.

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2. Be Sure You Receive Your 2014 Election Ballot

This year SAF is using a new vendor for the national and local unit elections. To ensure your ballot is received and accepted by your e-mail server, be sure to save the following e-mail address to your contacts before October 1: saf@intelliscaninc.net.

Members that do not have an e-mail address listed with SAF will still receive a paper ballot.

If you have any questions, please contact Patricia Adadevoh at the national office at (866) 897-8720, ext. 123.

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3. SAF Launches New Membership Portal

In response to members concerns about the functionality of the SAF website, the Society has launched a beta version of the new Membership Portal. Naturally, we want to know what you think about it, so check it out at live.safnet.org and send us your comments.

The portal is designed to offer easier access to SAF member services, expedite the renewal process, provide up-to-date information about members' involvement with SAF (e.g., CFE credits, subscriptions, and so on), give the latest forestry news, facilitate giving, and more!

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4. 2014 SAF Convention News—Info on Everything from Airfare to Presentations

US Forest Service Hiring for Internship Program at National Convention

This year the US Forest Service will be conducting a student internship recruitment event at the 2014 Society of American Foresters (SAF) National Convention, to be held October 8-11 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Students will have the opportunity to submit applications in-person at the Salt Palace Convention Center on Wednesday, October 8 and the morning of Thursday, October 9. Interviews will be conducted on-site.

Information regarding the positions available will be posted on USAJOBS on September 29. Only onsite applications will be accepted.

For more information, visit the Forest Service's Pathways Internship Program website.

Click this link for information regarding the specific positions available.

SAF 2014 Advance Convention Brochure Now Available!

The 2014 SAF National Convention advance brochure, which has information on everything you need to know about this year's joint SAF/CIF meeting, is now available on the SAF website. Check it out!

Complete Scientific and Technical Concurrent Program Now Online

The complete scientific and technical concurrent program for this year's convention is available online.

Volunteers Needed

If you're planning to attend the SAF/CIF convention or the IUFRO World Congress, please consider donating a few hours of your time to help the logistics of the co-located conferences run more smoothly!

SAF and CIF/IFC need volunteers to help with the Forests without Borders / Foresters and Science Fund silent auction and the SAF Store, as well as for the following specific jobs:

Registration Area Assistance
Wednesday, October 8
7:00-11:00 - 3 people
11:00-3:00 - 4 people
3:00-7:00 - 4 people

Thursday, October 9
7:00-11:00 - 3 people
11:00-3:00 - 3 people

Greeters at Convention South Center Entrance
Wednesday, October 8
7:00-11:00 - 1 person
11:00-3:00 - 1 person
3:00-7:00 - 1 person

Thursday, October 9
7:00-11:00 - 1 person

Exhibit Hall
Wednesday, October 8
8:00-11:00 - 2 people for set-up
11:00-2:00 - 2 people for set-up

Saturday, October 11
1:00-4:00 - 1 person for breakdown
4:00-8:00 - 1 person for breakdown

Speaker-Ready Room Technical Assistance Support

Wednesday, October 8
3:00-6:00 - 1 person

Foresters' Fund
Tuesday, October 7
10:00-4:00 - 2 people for set-up

Wednesday, October 8
10:00-1:00 - 2 for set-up
1:00-4:00 - 2 for set-up
4:00-6:00 - 5 people to disperse donation tickets
6:00-8:00 - 5 people to disperse donation tickets

Thursday, October 9
10:00-12:00 - 5 people to disperse donation tickets and 2 at the Foresters' Fund Table
12:00-3:00 - 5 people to disperse donation tickets and 2 at the Foresters' Fund Table
3:00-6:00 - 2 people to disperse donation tickets and 2 at the Foresters' Fund Table

Friday, October 10
8:00-10:00 - 2 people to disperse donation tickets and 2 at the Foresters' Fund Table
10:00-12:00 - 2 people at the Foresters' Fund Table
12:00-3:00 - 2 people at the Foresters' Fund Table
3:00-5:00 - 2 people at the Foresters' Fund Table

Saturday, October 11
10:00-12:00 - 2 people at the Foresters' Fund Table
12:00-2:00 - 2 people to help with close out

SAF Store

Wednesday, October 8
5:00-8:30 - 2 people

Thursday, October 9
8:00-11:00 - 2 people
11:00-2:00 - 2 people
2:00-6:00 - 2 people

Friday, October 10
8:00-11:00 - 2 people
11:00-2:00 - 2 people
2:00-6:00 - 2 people

Saturday, October 11
8:00-11:00 - 2 people
11:00-2:00 - 2 people
2:00-6:00 - 2 people

Sign up to volunteer in any position on the convention website.

Special Discounted Air Travel to Convention!
Salt Lake City has a large international airport and travel to and from this location can be direct through a number of other international airports across the country. SAF/CIF have formed a partnership with Delta and American Airlines to offer discounted airfare for convention attendees.

To Book Your Flight with Delta Airlines:

Visit the Delta website, select "Book A Trip," click on "More Search Options," and enter the meeting event code (NMHSJ) in the box provided on the Search Flight page. Reservations may also be made by calling Delta Meeting reservations at 1-800-328-1111, Monday through Friday during the hours of 7:00 am–7:00 pm CDT.

To Book Your Flight with American Airlines:

Visit the American Airlines website, select your flight options, use discount code 79H4BR, and select "Book Now" to make your flight reservation.

Note: To avoid a ticketing charge, make your American Airline reservations online.

For comprehensive convention travel information, visit the SAF Convention website.

Book Your Hotel Room NOW!

Go to the SAF convention website and click on the "Reservations" link.

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5. Research You May Be Missing

Interested in what your colleagues have been reading? Below are the top most downloaded articles from each of SAF's scientific journal publications for the month of August.

Producing "Society-Ready" Foresters: A Research-Based Process to Revise the Bachelor of Science in Forestry Curriculum at Stephen F. Austin State University (Journal of Forestry Vol. 112, No. 4)

Mountain Pine Beetle, a Major Disturbance Agent in US Western Coniferous Forests: A Synthesis of the State of Knowledge (Forest Science Vol. 60, No. 3)

To see the complete top 10 most downloaded article lists, visit the Publications page on the SAF website, click on the journal you wish to view, then click "Most Downloaded Articles."

Your GOLD- or PLATINUM-level membership entitles you to free access to all journal content, but you need to register with IngentaConnect to get it. Questions? Contact Matthew Walls.

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6. World Forestry Center to Hold Wake for Bill Hagenstein

An Irish-style wake will be held at 2:30 pm, Sunday, November 2 at the World Forestry Center in Portland, Oregon, in honor or Bill Hagenstein who died September 4. His remains will rest in Acacia Memorial Park in Seattle. Donations in Bill's memory may be made to Trillium Family Services in Portland, the World Forestry Center in Portland, or the American Cancer Society in memory of both Ruth Hagenstein and Jean Edson.

For more information, see Hagenstein's obituary from the September 12 issue of The Oregonian.

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About The E-Forester:

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