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July 24, 2015

2015 SAF National Convention Registration in Now Open!
Join us in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, November 3-7 and be part of the discussion on the trends, influences, and technologies that are shaping the profession in the 21st century!

 


For the latest forestry news, see the "Forestry News" section of the SAF homepage.

In This Issue ...

I. Featured News

1. Wisconsin: Bayfield County Officials Seek Balance between Forest Health and Deer Population
2. Arkansas Forestry Commission's Nursery Program Fills Niche for Landowners Big and Small
3. Oregon Forestry Board Weighs Bigger Logging Buffers to Cool Streams
4. Idaho Land Board Opts for Helicopter Logging in Contested Timber Salvage Sale
5. Wildfire News

II. Federal Lands Management

1. Bitterroot Forest's Largest Ever Road Decommissioning Project Begins
2. Mudslides, Debris Flows Block Forest Access Roads
3. Could Forest Thinning Help Ease Water Shortages in the United States?
4. Cal Fire and US Forest Service Work Together to Clear Trees
5. Agreement Reached in Tongass Land Swap

III. International Forestry News

1. Mozambique Will Have the Biggest Eucalyptus Nursery in Africa
2. From Axes to iPads: Logging the Native Forests of the New South Wales Mid-North Coast
3. Ikea Purchases 33,600 Hectares of Forest in Romania

IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Threatened Bats Halt Some Timber Projects
2. Murray Pacific Corp. Selling Timber Lands to California Forest Giant
3. County Wrestles with Erratic Timber Revenue
4. Timberland REITs Standing Tall
5. Proposal for Change Could Boost Timber Construction

V. Biomass

1. Red Rock Biofuels Lands Another Big Customer for Jet Fuel
2. 58-Megawatt Biomass Plant Planned for Former Weyerhaeuser Facility in Georgia
3. State to Award City $250K Energy Grant
4. EIA Proposes to Expand Biofuel Data Collection Activities
5. Push for Large-Scale Wood Pellet Mills as Tasmania Deals with Native Timber Waste

VI. Urban Forestry

1. First Signs of Dutch Elm Disease Detected
2. Forester Fears for Edmonton's Boulevard Trees
3. UT Students Survey Crossville's Urban Forest

VII. Plants and Pests

1. Forest Service Attacking Emerald Ash Borer in Louisiana
2. Scientists Using Fungi to Stop an Invader
3. Scientist: Ontario Spruce Budworm Infestation May Not Materialize

VIII. Science and Research

1. Controlled Burns Increase Invasive Grass in Hardwood Forests
2. Thinning and Burning: The Best Defense against Southern Pine Beetle
3. Bat Study Focuses on Nesting Trees in Northland as Deadly Disease Spreads

IX. Items of Interest

1. Salvaging a Long-Lasting Wood, and New York City's Past
2. International Paper, IIFM Ink Pact to Set Up "Center of Excellence"
3. Secretary Jewell, Chief Tidwell Join Community to Celebrate Browns Canyon National Monument Designation

X. SAF News

1. Earn CFEs for Your Reviews
2. Research You May Be Missing
3. Apply Now for 2015 SAF Diversity Scholarships
4. 2015 SAF National Convention News


I. Featured News

1. Wisconsin: Bayfield County Officials Seek Balance between Forest Health and Deer Population

Superiortelegram.com (July 22) - Foresters in Bayfield County, Wisconsin, say deer are having a significant impact on efforts to regenerate forest areas, and officials are now weighing options to balance deer numbers with the forest's long-term health.

But the Bayfield County Board and Forestry Committee say balancing the future uses of the county's approximately 169,000-acre forest, like timber harvests, with game is no simple task.

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2. Arkansas Forestry Commission's Nursery Program Fills Niche for Landowners Big and Small

Arkansasonline.com (July 19) - In this Q&A, Dave Bowling, reforestation manager for the Arkansas Forestry Commission (AFC), talks about the important mission of the AFC's nursery program and explains how a tree grows in AFC's Baucum nursery.

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3. Oregon Forestry Board Weighs Bigger Logging Buffers to Cool Streams

Registerguard.com (July 22) - A state board is considering how much to increase the numbers of trees that must be left standing along small and medium streams on private timberlands to shade the water and keep it cool for salmon.

A study known as RipStream has shown logging buffers on small and medium-sized streams under the Oregon Forest Practices Act don't do enough to maintain shade, allowing water temperatures to rise more than twice the standard of 0.54 degrees set by the Oregon Environmental Quality Commission.

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4. Idaho Land Board Opts for Helicopter Logging in Contested Timber Salvage Sale

Greenfieldreporter.com (July 21) - State officials have given their OK to modify a northern Idaho timber-sale contract to include helicopter logging that will cost the state up to $1.5 million in lost revenue.

The Idaho Land Board's 4-0 vote followed a federal court ruling earlier this month that put the Selway Fire Salvage timber sale on hold by temporarily banning the use of a contested US Forest Service road.

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5. Wildfire News

"Super Scooper" New Tool in Wildfire Fighting Efforts
News10.net (July 21)

Study: Climate Change Increasing Length of Wildfire Seasons Worldwide
Missoulian.com (July 20)

Drones Hampered Firefighters Battling Blaze that Torched Cars on California Freeway
NBCnews.com (July 19)

House OKs Wildfire Bill; Critics Call It "Bad for Forests"
AZcapitoltimes.com (July 16)

Battling Wildfires from Space
Spaceref.com (July 16)

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II. Federal Lands Management

1. Bitterroot Forest's Largest Ever Road Decommissioning Project Begins

Missoulian.com (July 20) - Work began last week on the Bitterroot National Forest's largest single effort to date to address the legacy of old logging roads.

A single excavator began obliterating the first of 66 miles of road built decades ago on lands acquired by the Forest Service from the Darby Lumber Company in 2013.

When the project is complete, another 51 miles of the road will be "stored," which means they will remain on the national forest's road system and will be made hydrologically stable before being set aside for potential future uses.

And in other Bitterroot News:

Forest Service Approves Como Forest Health Project Timber Sale

Ravallirepublic.com (July 15) - The Bitterroot National Forest moved forward this week on the last two projects to reduce hazardous fuels in the wildland-urban interface along nearly all of the western edge of the Bitterroot Valley.

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2. Mudslides, Debris Flows Block Forest Access Roads

KRCRTV.com (July 21) - Heavy rainstorms over the Klamath National Forest over the last week triggered several debris flows, with some blocking access roads.

According to a news release from the US Forest Service, water, rocks, mud, and trees were swept downslope in the Music Creek, Beaver Creek, Grider, and Walker Creek drainages.

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3. Could Forest Thinning Help Ease Water Shortages in the United States?

USDA.gov (July 22) - Planning for the future of the nation's water resources is more important than ever before as severe drought grips the West, affecting heavily populated areas and critical agricultural regions. Forests generally yield huge quantities of water-much more than crops or grasslands-but also use a lot of water during the growing season, so some land managers wonder if forest thinning could boost water supplies to people and ecosystems in a changing climate.

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4. Cal Fire and US Forest Service Work Together to Clear Trees

Sierra Star.com (July 22) - In a joint effort, Cal Fire, the US Forest Service, and the Madera County Road Department came together to begin thinning dead and dying trees on forestland in the Mountain Area in the vicinity of Oakhurst, California.

An estimated 160 cedars and pines, along with a few oaks were felled last week in Cedar Valley, which was the first of several needed tree mortality removal projects. The area was ranked high on the priority list because of having only one way in and out for emergency responders and residents in case of an emergency.

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5. Agreement Reached in Tongass Land Swap

Petersburgpilot.com (July 16) - The US Forest Service announced the next step has been taken in a land deal with Alaska Mental Health Trust (AMHT) that could see the transfer of nearly 40,000 acres of state and federal lands between the two agencies.

For AMHT, the deal will allow it to develop the lands' timber and mineral resources. (The trust manages lands for revenue generation that support these mental health services, and its assets include timber, coal, oil, gas, and minerals.) For the Forest Service, the exchanged lands will become integrated into its Tongass National Forest system, with parcels taking on the usage attributes of adjacent parklands.

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III. International Forestry News

1. Mozambique Will Have the Biggest Eucalyptus Nursery in Africa

Macauhub.com (July 20) - Next September, Portuguese pulp and paper group Portucel Soporcel is due in Mozambique to start setting up the biggest eucalyptus nursery in Africa, the group's CEO said during a visit to the group's industrial complex in Setúbal, Portugal.

Diogo da Silveira told the President of Mozambique, Filipe Nyusi, that the nursery will have an initial capacity of 12 million plants per year-a number that could double by 2016.

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2. From Axes to iPads: Logging the Native Forests of the New South Wales Mid-North Coast

ABC.net.au (July 20) - The days of the axe and the crosscut saw are long gone. But if you don't work in the timber industry, you probably wouldn't know that. Increasingly, a new breed of "bushmen" don't even use a chainsaw.

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3. Ikea Purchases 33,600 Hectares of Forest in Romania

Balkans.com (July 20) - IKEA has bought 33,600 hectares of forest in Romania from a private Swedish company to become the largest forest owner in Romania, according to Mediafax news.

The company purchased forestland in Prahova, Buzau, Vrancea, Botosani, and Bihor, and will coordinate its forest management activities through a Romanian company, IRI Investments Ltd, which is part of the IKEA Group.

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IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Threatened Bats Halt Some Timber Projects

Eagletribune.com (July 19) - The northern long-eared bat was officially listed as "threatened," just one step below endangered, in early April after a severe decline in their population in the northeast due to white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease. Along with that designation came some new rules for timber harvesting, a lawsuit, and an atmosphere that has those in New Hampshire's timber industry uneasy about the future.

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2. Murray Pacific Corp. Selling Timber Lands to California Forest Giant

Thenewstribune.com (June 26) - A family-owned Tacoma company that has owned and managed thousands of acres of timberland in Washington for more than a century is selling its Lewis County lands to Sierra Pacific Industries. The sale's completion is expected by the end of July.

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3. County Wrestles with Erratic Timber Revenue

Chinookobserver.com (July 21) - Like many other rural Washington counties, Pacific County depends on revenue from the sale and harvest of state-managed forestlands. That income helps to pay for local schools, ports, fire departments, and other essential services. But due to an ample regional supply of both logs and lumber, and lessening demand for lumber in China, lumber and log prices have fallen markedly since the beginning of 2015, according to a recent report from the state Department of Natural Resources.

As a result, the county's timber isn't expected to bring in much income in 2015. That will pose a serious challenge for county officials, as they try to hash out a 2016 budget over the coming weeks.

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4. Timberland REITs Standing Tall

Reit.com (July/August 2015) - Resourcefulness and prudent management helped timber REITs manage through the economic downturn, according to Collin Mings, a research analyst with Raymond James and Associates.

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5. Proposal for Change Could Boost Timber Construction

Sourceable.net (July 16) - There has been a positive step forward in the tall timber building movement with proposed changes to Australia's National Construction Code (Volume 1) to allow timber construction up to eight stories for apartments, hotels, and offices.

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V. Biomass

1. Red Rock Biofuels Lands Another Big Customer for Jet Fuel

Bizjournals.com (July 21) - Red Rock Biofuels LLC, a Fort Collins biomass-to-fuel manufacturer, has landed a subsidiary of FedEx Corp. as its second customer, following a deal inked with Southwest Airlines Co. last year.

The deal with FedEx Express, a subsidiary of FedEx, calls for Red Rock to supply the international shipper with about 3 million gallons of its low-carbon, renewable jet fuel for eight years. Deliveries are expected to start in 2017.

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2. 58-Megawatt Biomass Plant Planned for Former Weyerhaeuser Facility in Georgia

Madisonjournaltoday.com (July 22) - Georgia Renewable Power, LLC plans to use the former Weyerhaeuser/Trus Joist wood facility in Colbert as a multipurpose energy facility. According to the company, the facility will include storage for its equipment, as well as a 58-megawatt biomass facility that uses shredded forestry products to produce energy.

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3. State to Award City $250K Energy Grant

Lebanondemocrat.com (July 21) - Gov. Bill Haslam and Martineau awarded more than $3.1 million to fund energy efficiency projects for local governments and municipalities, utilities, and state entities across Tennessee. Lebanon was awarded $250,000 for a biomass gasification project.

Lebanon officials plan to implement a waste-to-energy biomass gasification project at a wastewater treatment plant. The project will use existing wood waste, wastewater treatment plant sludge, and the discarded tires as fuel to produce renewable energy.

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4. EIA Proposes to Expand Biofuel Data Collection Activities

Biomass Magazine.com (July 21) - In July, the US Department of Energy published a notice in the Federal Register inviting public comments on proposed revisions to certain information collection forms, including several focused on biofuel.

According to the EIA, the revision would assure continued relevance of the data it collects and improve market coverage by accommodating the potential for introduction of new biofuels.

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5. Push for Large-Scale Wood Pellet Mills as Tasmania Deals with Native Timber Waste

ABC.net.au (July 20) - There are hopes Tasmania will soon catch up to New Zealand, in developing large-scale wood pellet mills to process native timber waste.

The state's forest industry produces millions of tons of residues each year and the Tasmanian Government has called for expressions of interest from the private sector, to put them to good use.

Resources Minister Paul Harriss is pushing for biomass proposals, stating value adding in Tasmania is preferable to wholesale exports of woodchips.

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VI. Urban Forestry

1. First Signs of Dutch Elm Disease Detected

Thedickinsonpress.com (July 20) - The American elm was widely planted in communities throughout North Dakota because it grows quickly, has a long life, and is tolerant of compacted soils. And though it has thrived for many years, the introduction of Dutch elm disease-a fungus that was first recorded in North Dakota in 1973-has put the state's elms at risk.

This year, City Forester Koduah Owusu, said the number of diseased trees has increased.

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2. Forester Fears for Edmonton's Boulevard Trees

Edmontonjournal.com (July 21) - The City of Edmonton, Alberta, is reconstructing roads, gutters, and sidewalks in about nine aging neighborhoods a year, re-engineering and re-grading the infrastructure. Transportation officials and forestry staff work together and say they minimize damage to the trees, but not everyone agrees they're doing enough.

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3. UT Students Survey Crossville's Urban Forest

Crossville-chronicle.com (July 21) - Recently a group of UT students led by associate professor of urban forestry Sharon Jean-Philippe surveyed trees along public streets in Crossville, Tennessee.

Preliminary results of the survey have been submitted to the Crossville tree board. The final report will include the tree survey that outlines they types, conditions, and health of the trees along roads and streets in the city.

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VII. Plants and Pests

1. Forest Service Attacking Emerald Ash Borer in Louisiana

Magnoliareporter.com (July 18) - Efforts are under way in north Louisiana to slow the spread of the emerald ash borer, which threatens to destroy native ash trees. The trees play an important part in bottomland ecosystems and also have an economic value to the timber industry.

The LSU AgCenter, the US Forest Service, the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry, and the US Department of Agriculture's Animal Plant Health Inspection Service have collaborated to get a biocontrol effort off the ground in north Louisiana.

More:

Ontario: New City Campaign Takes on Pesky Bug
Chroniclejournal.com (July 17)

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2. Scientists Using Fungi to Stop an Invader

Dispatch.com (July 19) - Not everything the U.S. Forest Service does involves protection and conservation. Sometimes you've got to kill something.

In this case, it's an aggressive, non-native tree-Ailanthus altissima-that grows fast, spreads quickly and robs native oaks and maples and their undergrowth of the sunlight and space necessary for survival.

In a research project launched recently in Ohio, scientist Joanne Rebbeck is injecting a native fungus in hopes of stopping Ailanthus in its tracks.

Note: Rebbeck is a member of SAF.

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3. Scientist: Ontario Spruce Budworm Infestation May Not Materialize

CBC.ca (July 21) - Recent predictions of a moderate to severe spruce budworm infestation in northern Ontario may not materialize.

A spokesperson with the Ontario Forest Industry Association said collection of aerial data is ongoing and it isn't yet clear how the bugs will affect the forest next year.

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VIII. Science and Research

1. Controlled Burns Increase Invasive Grass in Hardwood Forests

Illinois.edu (July 21) - Controlled burning is widely used to maintain biodiversity and enhance regeneration of important deciduous tree species such as oak and hickory, but a recent University of Illinois study found that this practice also increases the growth of an aggressive species of invasive grass.

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2. Thinning and Burning: The Best Defense against Southern Pine Beetle

US Forest Service (July 21) - A recent study by US Forest Service and university researchers shows that thinning and prescribed fire can protect stands of southern pines on a landscape level from infestations by southern pine beetle. The results, published online in the Journal of Forestry, also provide first-time confirmation of the effectiveness of the treatments supported by the Southern Pine Beetle Prevention Program (SPBPP) to reduce stand susceptibility to the southern pine beetle in the southeastern United States.

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3. Bat Study Focuses on Nesting Trees in Northland as Deadly Disease Spreads

Duluthnewstribune.com (July 19) - It's not clear to scientists what trees northern long-eared bats roost in during the day or what trees females raise their single pup in June and July. And with northern long-ears newly protected by the federal Endangered Species Act, scientists are scrambling to fill in the blanks on the bat's life cycle.

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IX. Items of Interest

1. Salvaging a Long-Lasting Wood, and New York City's Past

NYTimes.com (July 21) - The blue-collar shop floors fall silent, find new life as artists' studios, then exchange their 19th-century guts for 21st-century wine cellars, marble bathrooms, and private gyms: So goes the story in a city where time does not stand still for long, and where a neighborhood's shifting fortunes can be told through its old warehouses and factories.

In the process, the city coughs up timbers that were logged and hoisted into place when it was almost young. New York is the country's largest repository of the lumber that formed the spine of the Industrial Revolution-a five-borough safe deposit box for New England white pine and spruce, Pacific Northwest Douglas fir and, especially, southern longleaf pine.

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2. International Paper, IIFM Ink Pact to Set Up "Center of Excellence"

Thehindubusinessline.com (July 21) - International Paper, India, and the Indian Institute of Forest Management in Bhopal, have signed a memorandum of understanding to engage in research and work on mutual interests in the field of forestry sustainability by setting up a Center of Excellence.

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3. Secretary Jewell, Chief Tidwell Join Community to Celebrate Browns Canyon National Monument Designation

USDA.gov (July 18) - US Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and US Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell joined hundreds of community members from the Upper Arkansas River Valley to celebrate the President's designation of Browns Canyon National Monument in Colorado. President Obama designated the area as a National Monument on February 19, 2015, in support of a decades-long locally driven effort to conserve and protect these spectacularly scenic lands.

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X. SAF News

1. Earn CFEs for Your Reviews

Reviewers for the Journal of Forestry and Forest Science may now apply for continuing forestry education (CFE) credit for their completed reviews.* Reviewers may request two (2) Category 3 CFEs for each completed review.

To request your CFE credits, please complete the Continuing Forestry Education Post Approval Form for Category 3 credit using the Publications section on page 2 of the form. Submit your completed form along with the thank you e-mail you receive from the journal acknowledging your review as evidence of completion.

*Effective April 14, 2015.

Questions or comments? Contact cf@safnet.org.

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2. Research You May Be Missing

Interested in what your colleagues have been reading? Below are the top most downloaded articles from each of SAF's scientific journal publications for the month of June.

The Burning Question: Does Forest Bioenergy Reduce Carbon Emissions? A Review of Common Misconceptions about Forest Carbon Accounting (Journal of Forestry Vol. 113, No. 1)

Twelve-Year Response of Coast Redwood to Precommercial Thinning (Forest Science Vol. 61, No. 4)

To see the complete top 10 most downloaded article lists, visit the publications page on the SAF website, click on the journal you wish to view, then click Most Downloaded Articles.

Your GOLD- or PLATINUM-level membership entitles you to free access to all journal content, but you need to register with IngentaConnect to get it. Questions? Contact Matthew Walls.

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3. Apply Now for SAF Diversity Scholarships

SAF Diversity Scholarships

Apply now to be part of the SAF Diversity Ambassador Program and participate in the 2015 SAF National Convention in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Ambassadors will receive leadership and networking training, interact with SAF leaders, meet the Chief of the US Forest Service and other professionals, and learn how to participate as a future leader in SAF.

The deadline for applications is Friday, September 4, 2015.

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4. 2015 SAF National Convention News

The 2015 SAF National Convention-Recreating Forestry-"The Confluence of Science, Society, and Technology"-will highlight a variety of contemporary forest resource management issues, including the trends, influences, and technologies that are facilitating the profession's progress toward the future. View the program here.

The meeting will take place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where attendees will enjoy fabulous hospitality, the charm of Louisiana's capital city on the banks of the mighty Mississippi, and world-renowned cuisine alongside a scientific and technical program that provides an intrinsic opportunity for exploring the many links between the social, economic, and ecological considerations that form modern forest stewardship. Visit the SAF Convention website for full event details.

Abstract submission is now closed for presentations in the scientific and technical concurrent sessions, but we are still accepting submissions for the poster symposium. Submit your poster here.

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About The E-Forester:

A Benefit of SAF Membership:
The E-Forester is sent to SAF members in good standing each week.

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The Society of American Foresters does not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the news items and/or links to additional information that appear in The E-Forester.

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The E-Forester will no longer include announcements for forestry events, gatherings, or tours not (co)sponsored by SAF.

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