Home > Publications > e-forester

April 24, 2015

 


For the latest forestry news, see the "Forestry News" section of the SAF homepage.

In This Issue ...

I. Featured News

1. NAU Forester Looks for "Survival Gene" in SW White Pine Trees
2. New Hampshire:Planting Begins to Stop Erosion along Ammonoosuc River
3. California:Sonoma County Seeks Assurances from Pomo Regarding Timber Harvesting
4. New York:Landowners Fear Loss of New York Forestry Tax Breaks
5. Fire News Roundup

II. Federal Lands Management

1. Largest Forest Service Restoration Initiative Reaches Milestone
2. Forest Service Eyes Healthier Woodlands in Land Between the Lakes
3. BLM Developing Watershed-Wide Assessment in Montana
4. Klamath National Forest Post-Fire Plans Run into Opposition
5. Big Thorne Timber Injunction Denied

III. International Forestry News

1. Smart-Web Forestry Company Treemetrics to Double Cork Workforce
2. Roundwood Trade Decreases in Finland
3. Australia: Critically Endangered Cypress Trees To Be Replanted in ACT National Park

IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Why Apple Bought 3,600 Acres in Eastern North Carolina
2. Bigfork Logger Named Logger of the Year
3. Intrexon, FuturaGene Partner to Improve Biomass in Eucalyptus and Poplar Trees
4. May the Forest Be with You: Using Whole Trees in Building Construction
5. M&A Activity in Paper and Forestry Sector Jumps More Than 300 Percent in First Quarter: PwC

V. Biomass

1. Biofuels Bill Big Win for Timber Industry
2. Yakima Company Will Design Generator that Converts Wood Waste to Energy
3. Engineered Softwood Could Transform Pulp, Paper, and Biofuel Industries
4. Cogeneration Cohorts
5. UK's Renewable Energy Targets Drive Increases in US Wood Pellet Exports

VI. Urban Forestry

1. Cedar Rapids Perfects Emerald Ash Borer Attack Plan; Could Cost $17 Million
2. Oak Park Named One of First Municipal Arboretums
3. Why Some New Yorkers Won't See Green Trees this Spring

VII. Plants and Pests

1. USFS Takes on Spruce Beetle Kill
2. New Online Resource to Help Control Asian Long-Horned Beetle
3. Public Encouraged to Get Involved in the Fight against Invasive Pests

VIII. Science and Research

1. Studying the Genetics of Wood Formation
2. Decreasing Biodiversity Affects Remaining Plants' Productivity
3. Research You May Be Missing

IX. Items of Interest

1. Predicting Tropical Deforestation with Big Data
2. Touch Wood for Greater Happiness at Work
3. New Rules Protect Prehistoric Relics in National Forests

X. SAF News

1. SAF Media Moments
2. SAF Forest Policy Activities
3. Openings for Vice-President and Board of Directors
4. SAF State Society Meetings
5. 2015 SAF National Convention News
6. Apply Now for 2015 Ben Meadows Scholarships


I. Featured News

1. NAU Forester Looks for "Survival Gene" in SW White Pine Trees

KNAU.org (April 23) - The Southwestern White Pine is under attack from a parasite. Almost all the trees infected by the "Blister Rust" fungus die. That's why forester Kristen Waring is searching for the rare genes in the species that can combat the deadly spores.

Waring is a forestry professor at Northern Arizona University. She says the non-native "Blister Rust" fungus has caused widespread die-off in much of the Southwestern White Pine populations of New Mexico. And now it's moved into eastern Arizona.

Note: Waring is a member of SAF.

Back to top

2. New Hampshire: Planting Begins to Stop Erosion along Ammonoosuc River

Greenwichtime.com (April 22) - Crews have started planting more than 2,000 shrubs and trees near the Ammonoosuc River in northern New Hampshire to stop erosion and create new wildlife habitat.

The Caledonian Record reports that erosion has been eating into the riverbanks near Lisbon. Crews from Redstart Forestry, a conservation group from Corinth, Vermont, hired by the Ammonoosuc Conservation Trust, will establish a 35-foot buffer of mostly dogwood and willow trees.

There will also be a riparian flood plain forest consisting of silver maple, red maple, cottonwood, box elder, and American elm. An upland forest is being created to include yellow birch, white pine, and white ash.

Back to top

3. California:Sonoma County Seeks Assurances from Pomo Regarding Timber Harvesting

Press Democrat (April 19) - The Kashia Band of Pomo Indians wants to expand its remote rancheria, and although Sonoma County officials are supportive, they want greater assurance to be able to weigh in on any timber harvest plans for the tribe's newly acquired property.

Back to top

4. New York:Landowners Fear Loss of New York Forestry Tax Breaks

Poughkeepsiejournal.com (April 19) - Thousands of landowners could lose tax breaks as New York regulators consider changes to a program that rewards property owners for good forestry practices.

Charles Stackhouse, president of the New York Forest Owners Association, said numerous landowner groups are opposing the Department of Environmental Conservation's proposed changes to the "480-a" forest tax law and have reached out to legislators about it.

Some of the changes would increase expenses for landowners, who would face more red tape and high fees to have their management plans certified.

More:

Proposed Changes to State Forest Program Worry Landowners
Poststar.com (April 17)

Back to top

5. Fire News Roundup

Fire Officials Decry Timber Management Procedure as Unsafe
Press Democrat.com (April 19)

Dry, Warm Conditions Keep California's National Forests Parched
LA Times.com (April 19)

Northern Minnesota Wildfire under Control, as DNR Urges Awareness
Bringmethenews.com (April 19)

Foresters Busy with Prescribed Burns to Prevent Wildfire Tragedies
Missoulian.com (April 18)

Back to top

II. Federal Lands Management

1. Largest Forest Service Restoration Initiative Reaches Milestone

USDA.gov(April 20) - US Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell said that the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI), the largest landscape-scale restoration initiative of its kind, has reached a pivotal milestone toward achieving accelerated forest restoration on more than 500,000 acres of the Coconino and Kaibab National Forests and grasslands in Arizona. Coconino National Forest Supervisor Earl Stewart and Kaibab National Forest Supervisor Mike Williams signed the final decision document for the project's first Environmental Impact Statement on April 17th.

More:

Plan to Thin, Save 600,000 Acres of Forest
AZ Central.com (April 20)

Forest Supervisors Sign Off on First Phase of 4FRI
KNAU.org (April 20)

Back to top

2. Forest Service Eyes Healthier Woodlands in Land Between the Lakes

Murrayledger.com (April 20) - It's been almost a month now since Land Between the Lakes officials announced a temporary freeze on future commercial timber sales contracts in the area. A clamor of logging and prescribed burning opponents had ventured as far as Washington, DC to make their voices heard before legislators and federal forestry managers. Critics have called the timber projects here a controversy, but forest officials contend that, behind the downed trees and burned foliage, is the future.

Back to top

3. BLM Developing Watershed-Wide Assessment in Montana

Helenair.com (April 19) - The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has spent the last two years assessing land conditions for the Marysville Planning Area, which includes nearly 15,000 acres of BLM property surrounding the town of Marysville and Great Divide Ski Area. The agency is now in the scoping phase of writing an environmental assessment, evaluating issues in the planning area and a course of action, and asking the public for input.

Among the management concerns already identified are fuel buildups posing a risk of fire, food storage in grizzly bear management zones, riparian restoration, timber harvests, noxious weeds, grazing permit renewals, and a possible reroute of the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail.

Back to top

4. Klamath National Forest Post-Fire Plans Run into Opposition

IJPR.org (April 20) - Nearly a quarter-million acres of forest burned in last summer's fires in and around the Klamath National Forest in northern California's Siskiyou County.

The US Forest Service is proposing a recovery plan that includes salvage logging and other elements critics say will damage wildlife habitat and make future fires more likely.

Note: SAF member Patricia Grantham quoted.

Back to top

5. Big Thorne Timber Injunction Denied

Juneauempire.com (April 16) - The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has denied an injunction requested by environmental groups, allowing the Big Thorne timber sale on Prince of Wales Island to move forward.

The announcement follows a March appeal by the Southeast Alaska Conservation Council to the 9th Circuit over the US Forest Service's sale of 6,000 acres of old growth and 2,000 acres of new growth forestland to Viking Lumber, one of the last local lumber mills in the region. Plaintiffs asked for the sale to be halted while the appeal is considered. The injunction only applied to the old-growth trees.

Back to top

III. International Forestry News

1. Smart-Web Forestry Company Treemetrics to Double Cork Workforce

Silicon republic.com (April 21) - A major $1 million European Space Agency contract with Treemetrics in Cork will see the Irish company's workforce double to 40, as the smart-web forestry business seeks out software engineers to aid its expansion.

The ESA contract, which is actually just one of a number of new deals for the company, targets a way to manage forests in real time through Treemetrics' web-based forestry measurement platform.

The software allows companies to monitor trees by satellite to measure attributes, provide early warnings for forest fires, and more.

Back to top

2. Roundwood Trade Decreases in Finland

HSFestForest.com (April 20) - The forestry industry in Finland looks set to experience a decline with regard to the production and trading of roundwood throughout 2015.

Figures compiled by the National Resources Institute Finland show that the use of industrial timber in Finland has remained fairly constant over the past few years, and officials expect this to be the case throughout 2016 as well. Consumption of this type of wood has decreased slightly in comparison to 2007, but overall appears to be performing steadily.

Back to top

3. Australia: Critically Endangered Cypress Trees To Be Replanted in ACTNational Park

AU.news.yahoo.com (April 21) - Critically endangered South African cypress trees are being replanted within the Australian Capital Territory's only national park.

A total of 100 Clanwilliam cypress trees were first planted in the Bendora Arboretum within Namadgi National Park to the west of Canberra in the 1940s.

Since then, all of the trees but one have died out and the species is declining internationally.

Back to top

IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Why Apple Bought 3,600 Acres in Eastern North Carolina

Bizjournals.com (April 21) - Computer giant Apple recently purchased 3,600 acres of forestland in Brunswick County, North Carolina, which will be managed by The Conservation Fund, an Arlington,Virginia-based conservation organization.

Apple plans to use the timber, a mix of loblolly pines and hardwoods, in the production of paper packaging for its products. The timber will be harvested in accordance with a management plan that focuses on sustainability.

Two Timber ETFs Felled Post Apple's Forest Buy
News.investors.com (April 20)

Back to top

2. Bigfork Logger Named Logger of the Year

Ifallsjournal.com (April 20) - The Minnesota Sustainable Forestry Initiative recently named Greg Cook Logging of Bigfork as the 2015 Logger of the Year.

Greg Cook Logging has been a member of the Minnesota Logger Education Program since the program's beginnings in 1997. Many of the company's employees annually attend training to ensure safety on the job. The company has achieved recognition as Minnesota Master Loggers since 1996.

Note: SAF member Tim O'Hara quoted.

Back to top

3. Intrexon, FuturaGene Partner to Improve Biomass in Eucalyptus and Poplar Trees

Biofuelsdigest.com (April 20) - In Maryland, Intrexon Corporation has entered into a collaborative agreement with FuturaGene Group, a subsidiary of Suzano Papel e Celulose S.A., the second largest producer of eucalyptus pulp in the world. The collaboration aims to increase biomass in eucalyptus and poplar trees.

This collaboration will use Intrexon's platform to design complex, innovative gene constructs and FuturaGene's expertise in plant yield enhancement to cultivate improved qualities in eucalyptus, the second most widely used species in the paper and pulp industry, as well as in poplar trees.

Back to top

4. May the Forest Be with You: Using Whole Trees in Building Construction

Forbes.com (April 22) - If there was ever a way to combine high tech and high touch, as John Naisbitt stated in the book High Tech, High Touch (his 1999 follow-up to his 1982 bestseller Megatrends),WholeTrees Architecture & Structures of Madison, Wisconsin epitomizes it.

WholeTrees uses trees as turn-key structural systems in commercial and residential building construction.

Back to top

5. M&A Activity in Paper and Forestry Sector Jumps More Than 300 Percent in First Quarter: PwC

BIV.com(April 21) - Global mergers and acquisition activity reached $12.3 (US) billion in the first quarter compared with just $2.9 (US) billion during the same period a year ago and US$1.7 billion in Q1 2013.

That 324 percent year-over-year jump was primarily attributed to Rock-Tenn Company's US$11.3-billion acquisition of MeadWestvaco Corporation.

Related:

Idled Chetywnd Pulp Mill Restarting
BIV.com (April 21)

Back to top

V. Biomass

1. Biofuels Bill Big Win for Timber Industry

Walkermn.com (April 22) - A group of timber, agriculture and environmental experts have all agreed that the legislature's advanced biofuel incentive program bill is a significant step forward and will make Minnesota one of the best places in the world to practice and produce biofuels technology.

The bill proposes production incentives for the following three industries:

  • Advanced Biofuels: Renewable fuels made from non-food materials such as corn stovers and wood waste.
  • Renewable Chemicals: Compounds produced from forestry or agriculture materials that can be used to produce plastics, solvents, cleaning supplies, and personal care products.
  • Biomass Thermal Energy: Uses materials, such as wood or agriculture residues, to supply sources of commercial or industrial process heat.

Back to top

2. Yakima Company Will Design Generator that Converts Wood Waste to Energy

Yakima Herald.com (April 20) - The US Department of Agriculture awarded a Wood Innovations grant to Yakima Specialties, one of two Washington state projects selected to share funding from a wood-related grant program that tops $9 million. The federal award amounts to $97,400, which Yakima Specialties will augment with a $64,500 match.

The federal money will help cover the design and engineering of the boiler, a process that is estimated to take about three months. Construction is expected to be finished in 18 to 24 months, meaning the boiler will go online sometime in 2017 if all goes according to plan.

Back to top

3. Engineered Softwood Could Transform Pulp, Paper, and Biofuel Industries

Wisc.edu (April 21) - Scientists have demonstrated the potential for softwoods to process more easily into pulp and paper if engineered to incorporate a key feature of hardwoods. The finding, published in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could improve the economics of the pulp, paper, and biofuels industries and reduce those industries' environmental impact.

Back to top

4. Cogeneration Cohorts

Biomass Magazine.com (April 22) - Procter & Gamble and Constellation Energy are building a $200 million cogeneration plant at P&G's Albany, Georgia, manufacturing plant.

Under terms of the partnership, Constellation will build, own, and operate the plant, which will supply steam to P&G's paper manufacturing facility via a 20-year steam supply agreement, and generate up to 385,000 megawatt-hours of electricity annually that it will sell to the local utility, Georgia Power.

Back to top

5. UK's Renewable Energy Targets Drive Increases in US Wood Pellet Exports

EIA.gov (April 22) - In 2014, almost three-quarters of all US wood-pellet exports were delivered to the United Kingdom, mainly for the purpose of generating electricity. Overall, the United States continues to be the largest wood pellet exporter in the world, as US wood-pellet exports increased by nearly 40 percent between 2013 and 2014, from 3.2 million short tons to 4.4 million short tons.

Back to top

VI. Urban Forestry

1. Cedar Rapids Perfects Emerald Ash Borer Attack Plan; Could Cost $17 Million

Gazette.com (April 22) - So restless are the city's forestry and parks officials over the arrival of the ash-tree-killing emerald ash borer that they've written the news release for the moment it arrives in the metro area.

City officials unveiled the city's new EAB attack plan and its 10 action steps to the City Council's Infrastructure Committee earlier this week. The plan could come with a price tag of $16 million to $17.5 million over 18 years.

Back to top

2. Oak Park Named One of First Municipal Arboretums

Chicagotribune.com (April 20) - With more than 100 different tree species within village borders, Oak Park has been named Illinois' first municipal arboretum.

Almost 19,000 trees were identified on village property, and more than 2,500 on Park District land. Between them, about 130 different tree species were identified.

Back to top

3. Why Some New Yorkers Won't See Green Trees this Spring

Epoch Times.com (April 22) - It's mid-April and the trees should have sprouted green buds by now, but in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, the spring looks apocalyptic.

Three years ago, Superstorm Sandy swept through the coastal neighborhood, pulling the Atlantic Ocean over city blocks as if it were a blanket. For those several hours until the water subsided, the saltwater soaked down into the roots of the neighborhood's trees.

Today, dead trees stand along the sun-soaked avenues bordering the bay, in the parks lining Brighton Beach and Manhattan Beach, and in nearly every front yard.

Back to top

VII. Plants and Pests

1. USFS Takes on Spruce Beetle Kill

Telluridenews.com (April 19) - The Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre, and Gunnison National Forests are actively working to remove trees and improve safety in areas affected by spruce beetle infestations.

In February, the USForest Service and the Colorado State Forest Service released the results of their annual aerial insect and disease survey in the state. According to that report, the spruce beetle was the state's most widespread forest pest for the third year in a row, and infestations occurred on 485,000 acres in the state in 2014, an increase of 87,000 acres from 2013.

Back to top

2. New Online Resource to Help Control Asian Long-Horned Beetle

Entomology Today.com (April 16) - The Asian long-horned beetle, Anoplophoraglabripennis, is a wood-boring insect that is capable of destroying 30 percent of the urban trees in the United States at an economic loss of $669 billion. Infestations of the invasive beetle have been found in Ohio, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Illinois, and it has been shown to feed on more than 100 different tree species, with a preference for maples, poplars, aspens, cottonwoods, and willows.

Now a new, open-access article in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management provides a comprehensive overview of the beetle, including a review of its biology, life stages, distribution, ecology, and methods of detecting and controlling it.

Back to top

3. Public Encouraged to Get Involved in the Fight against Invasive Pests

ANF Initiates Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Suppression Project
US Forest Service (March 30, 2015) - The Allegheny National Forest is initiating a project to suppress hemlock woolly adelgid infestations. The forest is working with surrounding public and private landowners to develop this landscape approach to reduce the impacts of the hemlock woolly adelgid to important hemlock areas.

Authorities Enlist Public to Help Scout for Emerald Ash Borer
DuluthNewsTribune.com (April 20) - As emerald ash borers munch their way further into the Northland, residents are being asked to stand on alert.

The bugs have not yet been found in Duluth. A sampling by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture last month turned up no evidence of emerald ash borer activity in Duluth.

But Kelly Fleissner, Duluth's maintenance operations manager, said they're on the way and called on Duluthians to pay attention.

Back to top

VIII. Science and Research

1. Studying the Genetics of Wood Formation

Newswise.com (April 17) - To begin to understand the complex genetic interactions that control poplar growth, a potential bioenergy crop, researchers developed a robust high-throughput pipeline for studying the hierarchy of genetic regulation of wood formation using tissue-specific single cells known as protoplasts.

Back to top

2. Decreasing Biodiversity Affects Remaining Plants' Productivity

WVU.edu (April 20) - A team of scientists, led by Jingjing Liang, assistant professor of forest ecology in West Virginia University's Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design, used data from Alaska's boreal forests to develop a model that measures and quantifies the effects of plant productivity resulting from a loss of species diversity.

The results of their research were published in the April 20 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Back to top

3. Research You May Be Missing

Interested in what your colleagues have been reading? Below are the top most downloaded articles from each of SAF's scientific journal publications for the month of March.

The Burning Question: Does Forest Bioenergy Reduce Carbon Emissions? A Review of Common Misconceptions about Forest Carbon Accounting (Journal of Forestry Vol. 113, No. 1)

Modeling Climatic Effects on Stand Height/Site Index of Plantation-Grown Jack Pine and Black Spruce Trees (Forest Science Vol. 61, No. 1)

To see the complete top 10 most downloaded article lists, visit the publications page on the SAF website, click on the journal you wish to view, then click "Most Downloaded Articles."

Your GOLD- or PLATINUM-level membership entitles you to free access to all journal content, but you need to register with IngentaConnect to get it. Questions? Contact Matthew Walls.

Back to top

IX. Items of Interest

1. Predicting Tropical Deforestation with Big Data

Discovery.com (April 22) - Silicon Valley data scientists are teaming up with rainforest conservationists to predict where and when the planet's jungles will be cut down ahead of time using new kinds of algorithms and satellite imagery.

Back to top

2. Touch Wood for Greater Happiness at Work

Financial Times.com (April 19) - Forget clean white spaces, if you want to optimize your working environment, clad your office walls in recycled timber, says Melissa Marsh, founder of US design consultancy Plastarc.

Back to top

3. New Rules Protect Prehistoric Relics in National Forests

Examiner.com (April 19) - The US Forest Service announced new final rules regarding Paleontological Resources Preservation. The rules, which were published in the Federal Register April 17, become effective May 18.

The new rules implement the Omnibus Public Land Management Act and the Paleontological Resources Preservation Act of 2009.

Back to top

X. SAF News

1. SAF Media Moments

Bullard, Ring Are among New SFI Board Members
Bettina Ring, State Forester, Virginia, and Steve Bullard, Dean, Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture at Stephen F. Austin State University, are among four individuals recently named to the Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. (SFI) Board of Directors.

Alavalapati Named Dean of Auburn's School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences
Auburn.edu (April 16) - Following a national search, Janaki Alavalapati, head of the Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation at Virginia Tech, has been named dean of Auburn University's School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, effective May 27.

Forestry Day at Fort Missoula
Missoulian.com (April 21) - On April 25, the Society of American Foresters, in association with the University of Montana Woodsman Team and the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula, will host Forestry Day at Fort Missoula. The day's events will include a one-of-a-kind Pro/Am Logging Show, where professional and collegiate lumberjacks from throughout the Northwest and Canada compete.

There will also be demonstrations of antique logging equipment, horse-drawn high-wheel logging demonstrations, steam-powered sawmill operations, antique farm and logging equipment and engines, chain saw carving, plus many more forestry displays.

SAF Members Appear in OFRI Video
SAF members George Ice, CF, Jennifer Beathe, and Lee Miller discuss forests, forestry, and water quality in this recent video by the Oregon Forest Resources Institute.

Back to top

2. SAF Forest Policy Activities

SAF Committee on Forest Policy member Diane Vosick, director of policy and partnerships at Northern Arizona University, testified before the Senate's Natural Resource Subcommittee on Federal Lands April 24. The hearing focused on wildfires in the West and potential forest treatment options.

For more information, including witness testimony, visit the subcommittee's website.

Back to top

3. Openings for Vice-President and Board of Directors

The Society of American Foresters is now accepting candidates for vice-president and board of directors.

Note the following dates:

  • June 1: Candidate materials for the office of vice-president and three directors are due.
  • October 1: Ballots to elect a vice-president and directors are distributed to voting members via email. Members without an email address will receive a paper ballot.
  • November 1: Ballots postmarked by this date will be counted. Ballots post marked after this date will not be counted.
  • Mid-November: Election results are verified and announced.

Procedure
On November 1, 2015 a vice-president and three directors representing voting districts 3, 6, and 9 will be elected for three-year terms beginning January 1, 2016. The vice-president will hold that office for one year, then serve one year as president, and one year on the Board as immediate past-president. Election to the Board is by district.

Board Eligibility
Elected directors shall be current, professional members and elected for three-year terms. They shall not serve consecutive terms nor be elected for more than two terms.

Board Responsibilities
The Board of Directors provides leadership and direction to the Society to ensure the achievement of its mission. Directors are responsible to SAF members for: fiduciary matters including monitoring and approving the management of the funds and properties of the SAF; assuring the development of appropriate plans for the organization; establishing SAF's direction and monitoring its implementation; reviewing national office programs as they relate to SAF's mission; developing with staff input appropriate governance policies and direction to the CEO to achieve the mission of the SAF; serving as a communication link from the Board to the members; reviewing, accepting, remanding, or approving reports of Board-appointed committees and task forces, the Forest Science & Technology Board, and House of Society Delegates; reviewing and ensuring compliance of relevant laws; ensuring that SAF, at all levels, operates in compliance with antitrust laws as stated in the SAF Antitrust Policy.

Instructions and Forms for Board of Directors and Vice-Presidential Candidates are posted on the SAF website.

For more information, contact Patricia Adadevoh, Leadership Services Manager, Society of American Foresters, 5400 Grosvenor Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814-2198; (866) 897-8720, ext. 123.

Back to top

4. SAF State Society Meetings

Oregon SAF-Oregon Chapter of The Wildlife Society Joint Annual Meeting
April 29-May 1
Eugene Hilton, Eugene, OR
Contact: Dale Claassen at (541) 954-6953, or Fran Cafferata Coe at (503) 680-7939

CO/WY SAF Joint Annual Meeting w/CTIA & CTFA
May 7-May 9, 2015 (Workshop and Business meetings only - May 7)
Glenwood Spring, CO

Florida SAF: 43rd Annual Symposium
May 13–14
Paramount Plaza Hotel, Gainesville, FL
Category 1-CF Hours: 8.0
Contact: Pat Minogue; (850) 874-7142

Oregon SAF Emerald Chapter Meeting
May 19
Steelhead Restaurant, Eugene, OR
Category 1-CF Hours: 1.0
Contact: Dale Claassen at (541) 954-6953

Maryland–Delaware Division SAF Spring Meeting
May 28
Woodmont Lodge, Hancock, MD
Category 1-CF Hours: 5.0
Contact: Robert Feldt; (410) 260-8529

Back to top

5. 2015 SAF National Convention News

The 2015 SAF National Convention — Recreating Forestry — "The Confluence of Science, Society, and Technology" — will highlight a variety of contemporary forest resource management issues, including the trends, influences, and technologies that are facilitating the profession's progress toward the future.

The meeting will take place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where attendees will enjoy fabulous hospitality, the charm of Louisiana's capital city on the banks of the mighty Mississippi, and world-renowned cuisine alongside a scientific and technical program that provides an intrinsic opportunity for exploring the many links between the social, economic, and ecological considerations that form modern forest stewardship. Visit the SAF Convention website for full event details.

Abstract submission is now open for individual presentations and panels in the scientific and technical concurrent sessions or poster symposium. Submit Your Presentation or Poster.

New for 2015! The "Boots on the Ground" concurrent track is designed to present case studies and research that can help field foresters find solutions to management problems they face on a regular basis. Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Managing around oil and gas pipelines
  • The Clean Water Act
  • Tips for working more effectively with contractors and migrant workers
  • Wild pig management
  • How to work with local ordinances
  • Maintaining soil physical and chemical properties and organic matter
  • Procurement tips and tools
  • Logging and timber supply trends
  • New and emerging field technologies

New for 2015! The SAF Matters concurrent track is designed to provide a forum for members to discuss various issues, share best practices for State Society management, or learn about and promote ongoing and upcoming initiatives.

We encourage your submissions on these and other topics: Recreating Forestry through Science, Recreating Forestry through Society, Recreating Forestry through Technology, Recreating Forestry through Education and Outreach, Agroforestry, Consulting Forestry, Entomology & Pathology, Economics, Fire, Forest Ecology, Geospatial Technologies, History, International Forestry, Inventory & Biometrics, Policy, Recreation, Silviculture, Social Sciences, Soils & Hydrology, US Forest Service National Silviculture Workshop (NSW), Urban & Community Forestry, Utilization & Engineering, and Wildlife Management.

For more information on presenting see the SAF convention website. Click here to submit an abstract.

Back to top

6. Apply Now for 2015 Ben Meadows Scholarships

Apply now for the $2,500 Academic Achievement and Leadership Natural Resource Scholarships from Ben Meadows!

All scholarship candidates must be enrolled, full time, as a junior or senior in a natural resource program working toward a bachelor's degree, which includes, but not limited to, agroforestry, urban forestry, environmental studies, natural resource management, natural resource recreation, wildlife management, wood science, and fisheries management.

Applications are due by June 30. Eligible students are encouraged to apply. Instructions, complete requirements, and the application form can be found on the Ben Meadows website.

Back to top

About The E-Forester:

A Benefit of SAF Membership:
The E-Forester is sent to SAF members in good standing each week.

Disclaimer:
The Society of American Foresters does not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the news items and/or links to additional information that appear in The E-Forester.

Meeting Announcements:
The E-Forester will no longer include announcements for forestry events, gatherings, or tours not (co)sponsored by SAF.

Feedback:
Do you have a comment about The E-Forester? Send it to us at Eforest@safnet.org.

Problems?
If you experience any problems with The E-Forester or you receive an error message that says, "You may have been removed from the mailing list" when you try to click a link, please let us know so we can work to resolve the problem. If problems persist, we can make arrangements to send The E-Forester to you in an alternative format.