Technical Tours

Agroforestry in New Mexico – Trees Working to Sustain Soil, Water, & Agriculture

Wednesday, November 15 • 8:30 am–5:00 pm • $85
For hundreds of years, trees have been an integral part of life for those living in the pueblos and Spanish land grants of what is now New Mexico. This tradition continues today, and participants on this tour will experience the hospitality of these land-based cultures. They will visit a traditional homestead incorporating multistoried gardens with small-scale livestock production; learn about range improvement on historic juniper savannas; and savor the nut from the New Mexico state tree, the piñon pine from forest management to nut collection and candy production, that also incorporates the state’s pistachio and pecan crops.
(Includes transportation, lunch, and bottled water)

Restoration of Interior West Frequent Fire Forests

Wednesday, November 15 • 8:30 am–5:00 pm • $85
Frequent fire forests (ponderosa pine and dry mixed conifer) in the interior West are experiencing degradation of ecological integrity, and mortality due to uncharacteristically severe wildfire, insects, and disease. Long term sustainability and resiliency to the current and future climates is reduced due to the prevailing current conditions that have developed over time due to suppression of frequent surface fires and other management actions. These projects demonstrate implementation of treatments focused on restoring characteristic forest composition, structure and spatial patterns, and ecological functions (surface fire) to achieve “desired conditions” over time. Each of these projects are part of large active and ongoing Forest Service CFLRP (Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program) projects.
(Includes transportation, lunch, and bottled water)

Rio Grande Water Fund/Santa Fe Fireshed

Wednesday, November 15 • 8:30 am–5:00 pm • $85
Water funds are financing mechanisms with the goal of improving watershed conditions and securing water for people and nature. Participants will learn how the Rio Grande Water Fund is being used to accelerate the pace and scale of forest restoration in north central New Mexico to address the threat of fire and postfire impacts in a 7-million-acre landscape. Participants will also be introduced to the concept of using a fireshed as the organizing principal for landscape-level restoration, with the case example being the 107,000-acre Santa Fe Fireshed led by a diverse collaborative.
(Includes transportation, lunch, and bottled water)

Walatowa Timber Industries 

Wednesday, November 15 • 8:30 am–5:00 pm • $85
Walatowa Timber Industries (WTI) is a sawmill that utilizes small diameter timber obtained from NEPA-certified forest restoration projects. Northern New Mexico forests supply beautiful, tight grained ponderosa pine, white fir, and Douglas fir timber. The sawmill is located at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico.  It is a majority native-owned enterprise of the Jemez Pueblo in partnership with Terry Conley. Not only does WTI provide economic opportunities for the members of the Jemez Pueblo and local communities, but it is a key utilizer of timber from forest restoration projects located in the Santa Fe National Forest, Valles Caldera National Preserve, and Jemez Pueblo tribal lands.
(Includes transportation, lunch, and bottled water)

Rio Grande Bosque Ecology

Sunday, November 19 • 8:30 am–5:00 pm • $85
In the American Southwest, the Bosque (which means “Forest” in Spanish) refers to the Riparian Gallery forests, historically comprised of cottonwood overstories, along the desert rivers. When rivers were regulated (dams, irrigation, etc.), the character of this forest shifted. The last few decades have seen major restoration efforts to bring ecological function and balance back into this highly altered ecosystem. This tour will explore three Albuquerque area parks and a local Pueblo and contrast how management objectives influence riparian ecosystem restoration.
(Includes transportation, lunch, and bottled water)

Trees and Historic Plazas: Urban Forestry in Albuquerque

Sunday, November 19 • 8:30 am–5:00 pm • $85
The key to urban forestry in a high desert city is water. Urban forests not only need water; they help mitigate water issues such as flash flooding and shade water features to curb evaporation. This tour starts in the Sandia Mountains foothills and explores the links between water, mountains, and city. Moving into the city proper, participants will see several examples of high desert urban forestry in action. The trip will include a half-mile walking tour along a paved path. The day ends with walking opportunities to view the stellar urban forest on the University of New Mexico campus.
(Includes transportation, lunch, and bottled water)

Jemez Mountains Forest Restoration Project (CFLRP)

Sunday, November 19 • 8:30 am – 5:00 pm • $85
Fire has always been a key ingredient in the volcanic-origin Jemez Mountains of northcentral New Mexico. In 2000 the Cerro Grande Fire burned into the town of Los Alamos and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. In 2011 the Las Conchas Fire, three times larger, covered some of the same ground. Much more is now going on in these mountains, including managed and prescribed fires, fuel reduction projects, old-growth restoration efforts, and more. State agencies, NGOs, universities, and individual citizens have led to landscape-scale restoration projects that reduce uncharacteristic fire risk, improve fish and wildlife habitat, restore watershed health, reduce invasive weeds, and stimulate the local forest products industry and the regional economy. The tour will visit sites within the Jemez Ranger District of the Santa Fe National Forest, the Valles Caldera National Preserve (National Park Service), and Bandelier National Monument.
(Includes transportation, lunch, and bottled water)

Tours that are undersubscribed may be canceled. Go/no-go decisions will be made on September 20. If you have purchased a ticket for a tour that is canceled, you will be contacted during the week of September 25.